Murphy’s

From Chisholm’s
“When things are good well,
Something will go wrong”

To Murphy’s
“If anything can go wrong,
It will (go wrong)”

There is a lack of faith
That good things can last
That maybe life is actually
Rigged in your favour (Rumi);

Maybe good things will last
If you believe them to be so
That perhaps all things are in the mind
If you will it to be so;

I think it’s worth a try.

Lawyer’s Creed

Belli’s Law reads that “There is never a deed so foul that something couldn’t be said for the guy; that is why there are lawyers.”

To adapt it to become a lawyer’s creed, it can be modified to read “There is never a deed so foul that something couldn’t be said for the guy; there however also is never an injustice so small that something couldn’t be said against the guy; that is why there are lawyers.”

The Soul 

“People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own souls. They will practice Indian yoga and all its exercises, observe a strict regimen of diet, learn the literature of the whole world – all because they cannot get on with themselves and have not the slightest faith that anything useful could ever come out of their own souls. Thus the soul has gradually been turned into a Nazareth from which nothing good can come.”

All the wonders of the world and beyond will be unlocked, if we just look inwards.

Know Thyself

Something I came across:

“To examine oneself and to seek to know oneself better does not equate to being a non-conformist or to toss aside moral principles and values; it means to truly instil in oneself values that are agreeable to us and to the wider world, which is possible only after careful examination of how we at the core experience and understand these values. What is extrinsic can only truly be accepted by the self after we have observed how it interacts with what is intrinsic and innate in us”

Deep Reality 

Imagine the current reality to be something like overlapping translucent sketch sheets, where each layer is an individual’s perception and his own reality. Some people have stronger minds and stronger wills, so the sketch on their translucent sheet is more distinct. 

Reality is something of an art piece that continually changes, and each person’s mind contributes a part to this ever morphing art piece.

If you actively seek to change your mind and your reality, it may affect the entire combined reality of this world that is made up of many, many sketches, depending on how strong the change is that may cause your own sketch to be more distinct and prominent. 

The universe is made up of all of the time-less art pieces that are made up of countless sketches, of all living beings and existences past, present and future. All of these art pieces co-exist together to form a complete picture, each art piece a different reality of different outcomes and possibilities. If you have strokes that are clear, focussed and powerful, the universe could just shape a master piece of artwork around you and allow you a glimpse of all the art pieces that makes up the complete picture that is the universe itself. 

You will then no longer be a sketch piece; you will be an observer of this process, and a witness of existence. 

Freud On A Monday

I have spent just about the entire Monday morning reading up on Freud again, and I must say I’ve always been a big, big fan of his works on psychoanalysis, dreams, memories and how the unconscious mind affects the conscious mind. 

Lightly reading over Freud makes me think we should all spend time contemplating the causations of some of our actions and words, whether in an assisted or unassisted environment. His psychoanalysis works affirm deeply that what or how we are now is very much a result of what happened in our past, with our childhood playing an especially critical role in forming our personalities and behaviours. Pretty commonsensical? Not if we understand it at Freud’s level, and not if deductions and reasonings are based upon countless clinical case studies and observations.

I think there is a certain stigma in the country about visiting a psychologist, and rightfully so apparently. The common associations with it are not kind, and thus the field of psychology here is relatively small as compared to other first world modern societies. 

If we remove all stereotypes and stigmas that are too commonly heard, a psychologist is just someone who helps you better understand your psyche by providing data and analysis in order to come up with deductions and conclusions. By tapping into memories and behavioural observations, recurring problems in certain aspects of life can be bettered and potentially resolved through professional analysis and therapy. 

I don’t disagree that mentally strong individuals can resolve their own problems by themselves through self-examination and reflection; they probably can go deeper without assistance through their own mental capacity and handling. The only  potential issue is that there is no outside observer to record anything that may have gone unnoticed, or that is subconsciously avoided by the person himself. The helper (aka psychologist) is able to provide a non-biased account of what he thinks the problem is or where it lies, and go where the individual himself may be unwilling or unable to go.

I think the work of a psychologist is noble in helping people cure themselves of mental issues on both the conscious and subconscious levels. It enables for more wholesome living and could resolve many medical or social issues that could plague individuals as a result of poor mental health. I also believe there are more to dreams and strongly preserved memories than we know, and it would be exciting to find out the interlinkages in the psyche so that we can better understand the complex workings of the mind and assist those who may have psychological issues that they themselves are not even consciously aware of. 

For a start, we should all try to come clean with ourselves and face up to what may be haunting us most (consciously and subconsciously) as we go through our daily lives. That is the best way to get acquainted with ourselves, and the start of the resolution to any problem. 

As Freud has said, “being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise.”

The Shooting Star 

“I believe in speed, not endurance.”

The statement above isn’t really wise in the long run (pun, if you get it! Haha.) both literally and figuratively, because to go far you need more than just a brilliant streak. You’d need sustained brilliance, and that is how it ensures you do not burn out or die off too early. You can ask Usain Bolt, he’s the fastest man on earth but he sure has endurance and he trains on his endurance in order to train his burst and speed. 

However, some people are really like the statement above and they do believe in it. It’s not their fault, but that’s just how they are and that’s how they think. They are like a brilliant flash, and after that they fade into oblivion but leave a lasting effect.

Think of a shooting star. You never see them around much, but when you see one.. It illuminates the night sky and it illuminates your life too. It appears when you least expect it to, and many a time it appears when you’re dozing off after waiting too long hoping to catch it, but with the little bit of energy you have left.. You’re filled with joy and ecstasy as you see it grace the night sky while you hurry to make a wish.

And then, it’s gone. That’s it. It came, it shone, and it left without saying goodbye. But you’ll remember it for the rest of your life. 

Some people are like that. They are not for the long run; they are for the moment. They are not here to stay, but while they’re here they make a huge impact and make their presence felt. They’re like shooting stars. They are speed, not endurance.

I’m starting to think this post doesn’t make much sense, but I think we all sort of get the idea. I’m sure you have someone who came into your life, changed the way you see the world, and left pretty much as sudden as they came. 

The world had them in Bruce Lee, Elvis Presley, John Lennon and many more.. and we all have them in our own worlds, albeit at a scale smaller to the world but no less significant to us.  

Who in your life do you think would say something like that?

Some Thoughts

I was reading up on Hume, Kant and some empirical arguments for the existence of God, and I had some thoughts which I think is appropriate to share. Nothing religious nor anything deep, just some first hand thoughts as I read. 

To prove the existence of God, we need empirical evidence to justify it to be true. Which is to say if we cannot have direct experience of God Himself, we need to at least have an experience of the demonstration of His experience,which likely would be a display of His powers. This would not be a question of whether the parting of the Red Sea did happen or not, or if Jesus did exist; this would be questionable as human account of historical events is fallible and accounts differ. (With no offence to anyone, I believe in Jesus entirely, as I do with the other great great teachers and beings such as the Buddha)

Rather, to prove this existence today, we need God to demonstrate His powers to us in the form of a miracle. Take for example, if God raises a mountain in front of the world; this would be a good demonstration as there are no means known to mankind to raise a mountain out of nowhere in a matter of seconds. This would be an apt demonstration of God’s omnipotence (one of three omnis).

Can you imagine though, if that really happened? People will find ways to know God even more, given that God is proven to exist. Man will attempt to use Science to understand this “phenomena”, and probably go to extreme means to comprehend this. This is really where the problem starts.

A paradox will happen. If God is logically supposed to be beyond Science, and a demonstration is used to prove God’s existence, then Science cannot be used to prove this. If something happens not to be understood but is sought to be understood, then a cyclical dilemma occurs.

That is to say that if the existence of God or God Himself is not to be understood, then this existence is only logical not to be proven or revealed directly. And if God is really proven to exist, his omnipotence etc will all be thrust into the spotlight, and God’s infallibility itself will too be diminished somehow. (We will find a way to reach God physically if He shows Himself to us)

So it is perhaps the desire of man to know God that probably prevents such a knowledge, and it too is the inherent need for man to gain all possible knowledge that it is unlikely for us to know God directly. Which in itself is a complex issue since it is taken to be believed that God created Man, and thus also created this desire in us which keeps us from knowing Him.