Fly Away With Me

An article I came across on the internet. Pretty good story and good insights too.

“A little bird was soaring happily in the sky as she took in the sights of
nature. Suddenly, a few stones struck her on her left wing. It came from a mischievous boy who thought it would be a good idea to hit the bird. She suffered some cuts and bruises to her left wing and couldn’t fly properly after that.

The little bird had no choice but to make for the ground and land in order to ease the pain. She landed with little grace, for the pain affected her ability to make a smooth touch down. She seemed to be in anguish and couldn’t really stand up straight.

Along came another little boy, who was talking a leisure stroll along the path where the bird landed. He saw that the bird was injured, and was determined to aid the bird as much as he could. He took the bird into his tender arms and tended to its wound with his handkerchief. With much care and affection, the bird was well rested and thus was able to fly again. The bird flew away, and made for the skies once more.

Now while the bird was able to fly again, its flight would be impeded for the rest of her days because the impact shattered something within her wing and the pain, while greatly reduced, would stick with her for all the flight time she would have left.

She remembers the boy who stoned her, but she flew off from the boy who tended to her with little more than a moment of thankfulness. After she could fly again, she made off for higher grounds and left the boy by himself without any further signs or showings of friendship. Did the boy mind? No. He was glad to have helped the bird, and continued on his stroll with a smile on his face, knowing he was of good use and help today.

The problem with some of us these days is that we remember deeply those who have hurt us, and not so deeply those who have loved us. Memories of the people who shattered us and caused our world to crash are deeply etched in the mind, yet it is not so easy to recall specific memories of special persons who pulled us up and out of the pits and picked up the pieces for us.

If I may venture a guess, I think it is because we blame others for our downfalls and misery, but we take credit for ourselves when we succeed or get back on our feet. We lament how this person brought us to our knees, wrecked our lives; yet we forget the significant person who turned things around for us, tried his/her best to plaster (excuse the pun) a smile on our faces with optimism and positive suggestion/influence etc.

As with the bird in the story above, she remembers deeply and painfully the boy who threw the stones at her and injured her left wing. Indeed, while the second boy couldn’t fully heal her wing, he at least made things better for her with whatever he could; if anything, he could have just walked away and not cared at all. For the bird and for some of us, some individuals are just interim measures to get us back on our feet and it is indeed cruel to just walk away after we have regained our footing.

So yes, let us remember to be grateful to those who have helped us regain our sense of direction and sense of self, those that enable us to find our bearings again. We owe it to them to erase whatever pain or damage that was previously inflicted, and to make what is to come better.

Perhaps my story isn’t complete: maybe the bird does remember the second boy fondly, and it is possible that she could be waiting for the right time to repay this deed of kindness and love.”

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To The Sky

When nostalgia hits
It hits hard
Like the beat of an old song
Or the etch of an old dance;

You look back and smile
Wondering where the moments have gone
Where the people are now
And if all that is left are only memories;

Yet you smile again after
Knowing the present is good
That without all that is before
There wouldn’t be a now and an after;

What has past is best where they are
Unwritten smiles
Untouched faces
Untainted memories;

A faint remembrance

is enough.

Excerpts [Part 1]

This post is made up of sentences and excerpts from a blog that I know pretty well;  thought it’d be a good idea to share some of the decent lines here. I’m probably splitting it up into a few parts because there are too many of them.

“A commonly visited leisure spot once upon a time has turned into a deserted playground of broken swings.”

“I’ll wait, til the day is mine.”

“There are days when you feel punched out, and today’s one of them.”

“It’s not a monologue.. it’s just a dialogue without response.”

“Behind every cynical person is a sad story unbeknownst to others.”

“Crack lines; try as you might to fix them, they’ll always be there somewhere.”

“The moment before I fall asleep is the happiest moment of the day; it is as though dreams have merged with reality. I feel alive and awake, but live a dream and a fantasy.”

“Accept and like a person not for what he is, but for who he is.”

“It’s like… after a person has made a wrong choice, you should let him choose again so that he is more clear about what he wants and will this time, make the right decision and appreciate the right decision so much more and never allow himself to decide or choose wrongly again.”

“There’s a reason why you should run after the bus, and not be lazy and convince yourself you won’t be able to catch it.”

“50% here and 50% there will not get you 100% anywhere.”

“… My fantasy is your reality.”

 

 

Ghosts

And he told him, “I’m not like you.. I don’t take all the shortcuts in life.”

Perhaps that is what is wrong with him, all the shortcuts he thinks he’s taking.

Sometimes maybe there is no shortcut. One has to grind it through, work for it, and get it after much sweat and tears.

The shortcuts may not lead to the destinations he’s looking for, they may lead him off course, to a totally different place that he may not want to be. Maybe these shortcuts are killing him unknowingly, such that when he looks behind him there is no one there and no place to be anymore.

Probably the only things left are the ghosts of a past time, of a past place, and of a past him.

Freud On A Monday

I have spent just about the entire Monday morning reading up on Freud again, and I must say I’ve always been a big, big fan of his works on psychoanalysis, dreams, memories and how the unconscious mind affects the conscious mind. 

Lightly reading over Freud makes me think we should all spend time contemplating the causations of some of our actions and words, whether in an assisted or unassisted environment. His psychoanalysis works affirm deeply that what or how we are now is very much a result of what happened in our past, with our childhood playing an especially critical role in forming our personalities and behaviours. Pretty commonsensical? Not if we understand it at Freud’s level, and not if deductions and reasonings are based upon countless clinical case studies and observations.

I think there is a certain stigma in the country about visiting a psychologist, and rightfully so apparently. The common associations with it are not kind, and thus the field of psychology here is relatively small as compared to other first world modern societies. 

If we remove all stereotypes and stigmas that are too commonly heard, a psychologist is just someone who helps you better understand your psyche by providing data and analysis in order to come up with deductions and conclusions. By tapping into memories and behavioural observations, recurring problems in certain aspects of life can be bettered and potentially resolved through professional analysis and therapy. 

I don’t disagree that mentally strong individuals can resolve their own problems by themselves through self-examination and reflection; they probably can go deeper without assistance through their own mental capacity and handling. The only  potential issue is that there is no outside observer to record anything that may have gone unnoticed, or that is subconsciously avoided by the person himself. The helper (aka psychologist) is able to provide a non-biased account of what he thinks the problem is or where it lies, and go where the individual himself may be unwilling or unable to go.

I think the work of a psychologist is noble in helping people cure themselves of mental issues on both the conscious and subconscious levels. It enables for more wholesome living and could resolve many medical or social issues that could plague individuals as a result of poor mental health. I also believe there are more to dreams and strongly preserved memories than we know, and it would be exciting to find out the interlinkages in the psyche so that we can better understand the complex workings of the mind and assist those who may have psychological issues that they themselves are not even consciously aware of. 

For a start, we should all try to come clean with ourselves and face up to what may be haunting us most (consciously and subconsciously) as we go through our daily lives. That is the best way to get acquainted with ourselves, and the start of the resolution to any problem. 

As Freud has said, “being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise.”