Freud On A Monday

I have spent just about the entire Monday morning reading up on Freud again, and I must say I’ve always been a big, big fan of his works on psychoanalysis, dreams, memories and how the unconscious mind affects the conscious mind. 

Lightly reading over Freud makes me think we should all spend time contemplating the causations of some of our actions and words, whether in an assisted or unassisted environment. His psychoanalysis works affirm deeply that what or how we are now is very much a result of what happened in our past, with our childhood playing an especially critical role in forming our personalities and behaviours. Pretty commonsensical? Not if we understand it at Freud’s level, and not if deductions and reasonings are based upon countless clinical case studies and observations.

I think there is a certain stigma in the country about visiting a psychologist, and rightfully so apparently. The common associations with it are not kind, and thus the field of psychology here is relatively small as compared to other first world modern societies. 

If we remove all stereotypes and stigmas that are too commonly heard, a psychologist is just someone who helps you better understand your psyche by providing data and analysis in order to come up with deductions and conclusions. By tapping into memories and behavioural observations, recurring problems in certain aspects of life can be bettered and potentially resolved through professional analysis and therapy. 

I don’t disagree that mentally strong individuals can resolve their own problems by themselves through self-examination and reflection; they probably can go deeper without assistance through their own mental capacity and handling. The only  potential issue is that there is no outside observer to record anything that may have gone unnoticed, or that is subconsciously avoided by the person himself. The helper (aka psychologist) is able to provide a non-biased account of what he thinks the problem is or where it lies, and go where the individual himself may be unwilling or unable to go.

I think the work of a psychologist is noble in helping people cure themselves of mental issues on both the conscious and subconscious levels. It enables for more wholesome living and could resolve many medical or social issues that could plague individuals as a result of poor mental health. I also believe there are more to dreams and strongly preserved memories than we know, and it would be exciting to find out the interlinkages in the psyche so that we can better understand the complex workings of the mind and assist those who may have psychological issues that they themselves are not even consciously aware of. 

For a start, we should all try to come clean with ourselves and face up to what may be haunting us most (consciously and subconsciously) as we go through our daily lives. That is the best way to get acquainted with ourselves, and the start of the resolution to any problem. 

As Freud has said, “being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise.”

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